Tuesday, August 17, 2010

WHO ~ first set of DQs

I found this photo of Maori people on a New Zealand travel guide.

1.  On the voyage to New Zealand, Mrs. Randolph, a fellow passenger, cares for Margaret as she miscarries.  Later, when Margaret tries to explain her frief over her new friend's death to Henry, she thinks, "the small transactions between women, particularly mothers, cannot adequately be explained to a man.  Some, like hers with Mrs. Randolph, will bind women for life."  Do you agree with Margaret?  Can a strong relationship between women be forged in a matter of hours?

2.  When my face-to-face book club discussed The Wives of Henry Oades, someone remarked on how much it showed women supporting other women.    Name some of the places that's true of the book.

3.  Why do you think Henry Oades misidentified Mim Bell as his wife?  How could he have made such a grievous error?

4.  Margaret teaches her children lessons every evening:  grammar, mathematics, and etiquette.  "It was her duty to prepare them for their return.  She refused to accept the possibility that they might grow old and die a natural death here.  Margaret never once considered setting her children free to be slaves."  She refuses to allow her children to live the life before them, planning, instead, for the life she hopes they will claim.  Why do you think Margaret remains so steadfast during their captivity?

4 comments:

Bonnie Jacobs said...

We have some "official" questions posted, everybuddy, though you don't have to wait before you post comments about our books.

Sorry for the delay, buddies. I guess I have too much going on in my life right now.

Shirley said...

1. On the voyage to New Zealand, Mrs. Randolph, a fellow passenger, cares for Margaret as she miscarries. Later, when Margaret tries to explain her grief over her new friend's death to Henry, she thinks, "the small transactions between women, particularly mothers, cannot adequately be explained to a man. Some, like hers with Mrs. Randolph, will bind women for life." Do you agree with Margaret? Can a strong relationship between women be forged in a matter of hours?
Although I can't remember a similar personal experience, it sounds like it could happen especially when the timing is right. I would think that this could happen with men as well.

2. When my face-to-face book club discussed The Wives of Henry Oades, someone remarked on how much it showed women supporting other women. Name some of the places that's true of the book.
I think that the relationship between Mim and Margaret and later the relationship between Nancy are Margaret were good examples of women supporting women.

3. Why do you think Henry Oades misidentified Mim Bell as his wife? How could he have made such a grievous error?
I think he wanted to know what happened to his wife and that he didn't look that closely at the body.

4. Margaret teaches her children lessons every evening: grammar, mathematics, and etiquette. "It was her duty to prepare them for their return. She refused to accept the possibility that they might grow old and die a natural death here. Margaret never once considered setting her children free to be slaves." She refuses to allow her children to live the life before them, planning, instead, for the life she hopes they will claim. Why do you think Margaret remains so steadfast during their captivity?
Teaching the children not only prepared them for the hoped for future, but helped them to become the people she wanted them to be. The teaching not only kept hope alive, but gave a purpose to each day.

Susan said...

Bonnie, don't over-do it, you have a lot going on, teaching the writing class and working at the library are only two of the many things you do. Take care of yourself!

Bonnie Jacobs said...

Thanks for the reminder, Susan, but don't worry ... I learned to pace myself when it took a year for the breastbone to completely mend after bypass surgery. That's why I didn't get the questions posted on time here at Book Buddies this month.

Shirley, it was interesting to see the way Nancy and Margaret supported each other, even though outsiders might assume they would be rivals or their husband's attention. I'm not sure men form friendships -- or bond -- the way women do. I hope other Book Buddies speak up about this.